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To some it’s the most wonderful time of the year. Other don’t care. We’ve summed up, why you must not miss going to Prague and participate at the Czech Open.

1. Elite is all around us
You won’t find any tournament worldwide, where you’ll be able to watch that many high class international matches. Pixbo, Falun, Wiler, Tatran, and this year even the new project Erä Viikingit from Finland. You wanna learn from the best? You got served.

2. Lavka is waiting
As the four-storey mega club of Karlovy Lazne is hugely overrated (bad music, bad service, bad climate), Lavka is the real place to be. Get your drink, make some moves on the floor and chill in the breeze of a nightly Prague on the club’s own pier. There you’ll get a chance to chat with all the stars as you would be on a best friend’s garden party.

3. International competition
Even if your not fighting for any prize money in the elite groups, you’ll still get the chance to face opponents from all around the world. 273 teams from 19 countries will be coming this summer. That means over 7.000 participants. The Czech Open are a foot print of our generation.

Become part of an international community. / Photo by Czech Open PR
Become part of an international community. / Photo by Czech Open PR

4. Like a fair
With all these incredible numbers, the Czech Open tournament is kind of a fair, too. Have you ever though of moving abround, or you just wanted to meet people from certain places? No problem, just check the schedule and get in touch.

5. Reward your body
The living standards might be going up in the Czech Republic, but the prizes are still far bellow european average. As most of you don’t see the Czech Open as any kind of serious preparation anyways, enjoy all the tasty foods and drinks. And just to make sure, here’s the Czech beer index (prize per 100 big beers or 50 l).

6. It’s summer
But don’t reward your body too generously. Stay in shape. Prague is full of young people wearing stickbags, flipflops and only the most necessary of clothes. A good thing, we suppose.

273 teams. 19 countries. 7.000 participants. / Foto: Czech Open PR allstarfoto.com
273 teams. 19 countries. 7.000 participants. / Foto: Czech Open PR allstarfoto.com

7. Solid referees
If you’re coming from a developing floorball country, you know it’s hard to educate good refs. Compared to other tournaments the referee quality of the Czech Open incredibly high. Almost all of them speak languages (coming from over 10 countries), know what they’re doing and have the proper feel for what such summer games demand.

8. Prague is coming
For many years, after the velvet revolution, Prague was focusing on how to squeeze out the most out of it’s touristic potential, neglecting the creativity of it’s new generation. In a certain way, that might still be the case, but the city is moving away from being just a boring mainstream tourist metropole. Nowadays, you might discover new clubs, bars and galleries that provide Prague with a more alternative touch.

9. Take it easy
The matches are a bit short, some halls a bit dodgy, and you should never ever leave your stuff unattended (actually even that doesn’t help, as someone stole five toolbags from Cosmo’s players bench two years ago – during the first period). But don’t worry. Otherwise all is perfect and you know you’ll start looking forward to the next tournament right from the Monday after.

A great place to propose, too. / Photo by Czech Open PR
A great place to propose, too. / Photo by Czech Open PR

10. Je ne sais quoi
And then there is this certain something. For example, Prague might not be some sunshine town in general. But there has to be some magic involved, because you hardly ever get disappointed by the local weather during Czech Open. Having said that… take an umbrella with you. However, unexplainable things happening all around you. So if you suddenly wake up at some highway petrol station with someone else’s shirt on, don’t worry, you’re not the first (ask our editor) and not the last. But don’t worry, what happens in Prague, stays in Prague.

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